The Probe - Proudly serving the dental profession for over 60 years

Smile – April – Succession planning: what you need to know

Course Dates: Open-ended
Enrollment Dates: Enroll Anytime
Who can Enroll: Anyone
Course Language: English
Price: FREE

About the Course

• To understand how the business is likely to be affected after a partner’s death

• To understand what steps surviving partners will need to take after a death

• To understand the additional steps that it is advisable to take in anticipation of the possible death of a partner.

Instructors

The Probe

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Further details revealed ahead of Allergan Aesthetics’ Spark Talk

Course Dates: Open-ended
Enrollment Dates: Enroll Anytime
Who can Enroll:
Price: FREE

About the Course

As previously reported, medical aesthetics company, Allergan Spark, has created a knowledge hub to provide healthcare professionals with access to real-time business and clinical support online resources, as well as access to events, webinars, and talks. In June, Allergan issued a challenge to healthcare professionals – including dentists – who use the Sparks hub, to video a 30-second pitch about a business-related idea, insight or clinical pearl they would like to share with the profession, ultimately deciding upon the final seven to each deliver a Spark Talk aimed at sparking inspiration and enhancing the knowledge of aesthetic professionals who would like to increase their facial aesthetic offering.

The talks take place on 22nd July at 7pm and will share personal insights including:

The Spark Talks will focus on different topics, each of interest to aesthetic professionals looking for ways to expand their skills and their practices.

Dr Manav Bawa is an advanced cosmetic doctor, who will be giving his talk about the patient journey. He says: “I hope that my colleagues will take away a few hints and tips to put into practice straight away. Simple things that will really help them move from the blind leading the blind to actually having some structure in place for them to run their own business. To look to achieve those goals and to actually get there.”

All the clinicians are keen to share their expertise, what they have learned, and what they would like to pass on to help those who are keen on expanding their facial aesthetics experience to complement their dental skills.

“In my experience it’s really hard to turn people away for treatment”, says Dr Emma Sloan, an International aesthetics trainer and ‘Expert Injector’, who’s talk will focus on establishing a roadmap to treat difficult cases. “Part of the skill to being an aesthetician is to know who to turn away from a professional point of view, but also if it’s in their best interest. You have to be careful that you always sign post patients to somewhere where they can seek help. It’s really important to handle those cases sensitively.”

Dr Mo and Dr Abdu Nassimizadeh have quickly established impressive reputations both as individuals and collectively within the aesthetic industry. Dr Abdul explains why photography will form the basis of their talk: “Dental photography became a big thing over the last year or two years. Photography in aesthetics is a brilliant way of improving social visibility, but it becomes a minefield for patients if practitioners start editing photos, so it’s important that people learn to take great photos that show their work honestly.”

“The overall aim of my talk is to educate healthcare professionals about patient complications, adds Dr James Olding a GMC-registered doctor training in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. “It will outline why I think regulation is so important, because it will improve patient safety. Complications will always happen, but the issue is recognising and dealing with it.”

To attend the live Allergan Spark Talks on 22nd July at 7pm please register via: https://mailchi.mp/allergan/allergan-spark

BAPD seeks new guidance from government to help to screen for oral cancer

Course Dates: Open-ended
Enrollment Dates: Enroll Anytime
Who can Enroll:
Price: FREE

About the Course

The British Association of Private Dentistry (BAPD) has advised the government that it needs to change its guidance in order to help dental practices successfully screen for oral cancer.

The Association recently conducted a straw poll of its members in order to find out whether dental professionals were encountering problems in referring patients who were suspected of having mouth cancer. The results found that 676 out of the 755 respondents had experienced referral problems when seeking secondary care.

The poll comes following research, which has suggested that more than 24,000 cases of cancer have gone undiagnosed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jason Smithson, Co-founder of the BAPD, said: “The comments would suggest a multi-factorial problem; however, there would seem to be some common themes. Clearly, this is a serious problem for the profession. Therefore, we have compiled a survey that we hope to present to PHE and NHSE and may impact fallow and PPE.”

BDA commits to tackling racism and discrimination at all levels in dentistry

Course Dates: Open-ended
Enrollment Dates: Enroll Anytime
Who can Enroll:
Price: FREE

About the Course

The British Dental Association has set out its commitment to tackle racism and discrimination at all levels in dentistry, following international outcry initiated by the death of George Floyd in May.

In response the Association has set out a major programme of work. It will engage with BAME dentists, as part of a research project to establish the views of those involved both in its ranks and the wider profession, to identify clearly those areas where racial disparities and racism exist within dentistry and on the basis of this develop an evidence-based action plan to address them.

Despite the demographic changes in the make-up of the dental profession, Black people are still significantly underrepresented, accounting for only one per cent of the GDC register. While other BAME groups are steadily increasing in number, all remain underrepresented at all levels within the profession’s leadership.

The BDA is currently undertaking a comprehensive review of its governance structures, with an emphasis on diversity and ensuring that it represents the profession fully at its heart. Lack of diversity in leadership is an issue across health care, with research describing ‘the snowy white peaks’ at the top of the NHS.

There is also evidence to suggest that BAME patients are less likely to attend the dentist. The BDA has said the reasons for this need to be clearly understood, so that all communities can have access to dental services on an equal footing. Public Health England analysis of the disparities in Covid-19 outcomes related to ethnicity and other factors have drawn renewed attention to health inequalities and dentist leaders have said these inequalities must be addressed in oral health as well.

BDA Chair Mick Armstrong said: “The dental profession is guided by the principle of acting in the best interests of patients, regardless of their background. Yet it is clear, as recent events have highlighted, that we still have a long way to go before everyone in our society is treated equally, and with dignity and respect. Recent events have forced us all to confront the reality of continued anti-Black racism. We stand in solidarity with those who have been peacefully demonstrating against anti-Black racism and say, unequivocally, that Black lives matter.

“Deeds not words is our mantra. We are resolved to do what we can to overcome persistent inequalities and discrimination, whether that is challenging the words and behaviours of colleagues, patients and officials, or reforming and transforming the world in which we all work.”